Sunday, 7 October 2012

Cadogan & Hall launch new website

Cadogan and Hall have just launched a brand new website and we think it looks pretty special!

The site is designed to give a clear description of the services we provide, and it features examples of the work we have produced recently for Adelaide and South Australian businesses, such as websites, online blogs, articles and press releases.

Our new site was produced by Media Gain, another Adelaide company and, as we say, it looks wonderful!

Please come and have a look and tell us what you think!
www.cadoganandhall.com



Adelaide Writing Agency
Cadogan & Hall www.cadoganandhall.com

Thursday, 4 October 2012

Media Gain and Cadogan & Hall launch new website for Adelaide company Builders At Your Service


Website designers Media Gain and online content writers Cadogan & Hall have produced a new website for Adelaide construction company Builders At Your Service.

A new website for Adelaide building and construction company Builders At Your Service has just gone live, and is the latest to be produced by Adelaide website designers Media Gain and online content writers Cadogan & Hall.  Media Gain and Cadogan & Hall specialise in producing engaging and affordable websites for small- and medium-sized businesses throughout South Australia, and are establishing a growing reputation for helping their clients to be found online.

The two companies work together closely to ensure that there is a good blend of image and content in their websites, and support clients in getting their message out across social media as well.

“We really focus on helping smaller businesses establish their presence on the internet,” said Denise Angus of Media Gain.  “For small and medium enterprises, it can sometimes be hard to compete with bigger firms, but we think our combination of attractive design, user-friendly functionality and high-quality, professionally researched and written content goes a long way towards getting our clients’ names and services out there and known to the wider Adelaide public.”

The emphasis on top quality content is vital, and Media Gain and Cadogan & Hall work closely with their clients to create content that is engaging, informative and unique.

“In the case of Builders At Your Service, for instance, we spent an afternoon with the owner of the company Gavan O’Connor, really getting to know him and his business,” said Denise Angus.  “In this way, we were able to get a good understanding not only of the nuts and bolts of the business, but also the whole ethos of the company.  We came to understand what makes them different from other companies working in home construction and renovation, and this is what we tried to bring out on the website.  If you visit the site, we think that you’ll get a real sense of what makes the company tick, and what makes them unique.  For smaller businesses like Builders At Your Service, this is really important and so this is where we have sought to develop our expertise.”

Cost-effectiveness is, of course, also an important consideration for small and medium enterprises, and so Media Gain and Cadogan & Hall have website and online content packages that are within the reach of companies large and small.  The websites they produce are also promoted extensively across social media and this adds further value for a new business or one that is just beginning to establish an online presence.

To find out more about the affordable website design and online content packages being offered in Adelaide by Media Gain and Cadogan & Hall, contact Denise Angus at denise@mediagain.com.au or visit www.mediagain.com.au


Affordable website design in Adelaide
Adelaide Web Designers Media Gain

Press releases, articles, online content in Adelaide
Adelaide Online Content Writers Cadogan and Hall
Adelaide Building and Construction Company
Adelaide Building and Construction Company Builders At Your Service




Saturday, 21 April 2012

On Reading Other People's Diaries (Part 1)

On Reading Other People's Diaries (Part 1)

The first in a short series of articles on the enduring popularity of diaries, including some of the most engaging examples from across a range of styles and times.

The diary as a literary form remains with us and continues to engage and enthral.  What lays behind its enduring appeal?  Firstly, there is the sense of intimacy - we are able to witness (at second hand, at least) events as they unfold.  In the case of political diaries, we are able to gain some insight (depending on the author's proximity to events) into the thinking behind occasions of importance and significance to which we might not otherwise have access.

We are also able to learn about the author in a manner different to that of a biography or autobiography.  In the case of the latter, there is always the tendency (however subconscious) for the subject to portray themselves or their role in events in a more positive light.  The benefit of hindsight works wonders, and the autobiography (particularly in the political sphere) often winds up being a litany of self-justification (when things went wrong) or self-congratulation (when they went right).  This doesn't happen with diaries - we see people's vacillations, indecision, and sometimes their sheer bewilderment at what is happening around them.  What an honest and forthright diary captures is the changes in the state of mind of the author - today, life is hopeless, tomorrow it will be exhilarating.  An engaging diary should remind us that our perspective on the world on any given day is not an irreversible, indelible truth.  Rather, it is a reflection of circumstance, mood and our relationships with others on a given day, and is always subject to change at short notice.

The diary has not been superseded by the blog.  They serve very distinct purposes and so their intrinsic characters will continue to remain separate.  The blog is written with the intention of its being published and read immediately.  It is written with a particular audience in mind and often invites instant comment or feedback.  This undoubtedly affects how we read a blog, as we take it in instalments as they are produced, and this doesn't always provide opportunity for detailed analysis or comparison, or allow us to stand back and take an overview of the author's changing perspectives.   The blog is not designed as a record, more of a running commentary, and so for that reason it will often tend to lack a sense of perspective.

The diary, on the other hand, while also recording events contemporaneously, is nevertheless not designed for immediate consumption.  We are able to digest a longer period of time in one sitting, and so we have more points of comparison and reference.  To push the analogy, we are able to order from the full menu at the outset, rather than simply taking each course as it comes.  The diary often offers such an engaging insight into events because it manages to combine both immediacy and overview at the same time.  We have events being recorded as they unfold, but we can simultaneously gain an understanding of the full story from beginning to end.

With the above in mind, we would heartily recommend the series of political diaries that have been published recently by the former British Labour MP, Chris Mullin.  Mr Mullin, as well as being the author of the 1982 novel A Very British Coup, led the campaign for the overturning of the wrongful convictions of the Birmingham Six and Guildford Four.  His diaries cover an historic time in British politics - the birth and rise to power of New Labour including, perhaps most significantly, the time of Britain's decision to join the allied invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq.

As can be deduced from the titles, A View From the Foothills (2009), Decline and Fall (2010) and A Walk-on Part (2011) Mr Mullin was not a big-hitter in the New Labour regime (rising only as high as a junior cabinet minister), but the diaries are all the richer for that.  He is both an insider and an outsider at the same time, with access to the decision-making process beyond the rest of us, while still being (frustratingly, for him and us) a long way from the real heart of the action.

Mr Mullin is a wonderful diarist.  He writes with clarity, honesty and a degree of self-effacement that is extremely engaging.  We share his frustrations at the powerlessness (at times) of the backbench MP, his efforts to fight bureaucratic indifference on behalf of his constituents, and his moments of (admittedly) small triumph in the face of overwhelming odds.  The sections dealing with his elevation to junior minister ranks in the Department of the Environment are especially interesting, as are those dealing with his later return to government in the Department for Overseas Development.  What we see is a principled, decent and honest MP (and as the diaries reveal, the latter is in short supply) struggling against inertia to achieve positive change on behalf of his constituents and the nation.

Perhaps the most horrifying part of the diaries is the vacuousness at the heart of the New Labour project that they reveal.  Mr Mullin rightly details the successes of the Blair/Brown years (and despite everything, they did undoubtedly improve the lot of many people in need), but he also chronicles their lack of vision and cohesion.  The infighting, political machinations and sheer opportunism of leading politicians is laid bare and, while none of this should come as a surprise, it is nevertheless a salutary lesson to us all.  This is nowhere in evidence more than on the debates regarding British involvement in the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan.  Mr Blair is revealed to have essentially taken the decision to join the invading alliance of his own accord, with little or no pressure on him from either the electorate or members of his government.  Whether the decision was right or wrong, the lack of consultation, rational debate or disclosure of facts should give us all pause.

Mr Mullin undoubtedly ranks alongside Richard Crossman and Alan Clark as the pre-eminent political chroniclers of their times.  Anyone with an interest in recent international history, the nature of politics or simply engaging, well-constructed writing, should seek them out.

Chris Mullin's website can be accessed here

Chris Mullin writes about the genesis of 'A Very British Coup' in the 'Guardian'